Asylum seekers show athiopian coffee ceremony

asylum seekers show athiopian coffee ceremony

The smell of coffee may not have been as intense as in a tchibo store, but the athiopian coffee ceremony in front of the marienanstalt took the visitors into a completely foreign culture. The mild summer evening was just made for this excursion to faraway athiopia. For the asylum seekers it was an opportunity to present an important need of their home country. For the visitors it was a two-hour time-out – a small cultural vacation next to the munnerstadt marketplace.

Munnerstadt resident barbel furst initiated this ceremony. She voluntarily gives german courses for asylum seekers in munnerstadt. Nearly 20 asylum seekers from athiopia currently live in munnerstadt. And the women gladly accepted the offer. Coffee ceremonies, explained barbel furst during the coffee-making, is women’s or. Girl thing. Buna is the coffee in athiopia. And from there it is said to have started its triumphal procession all over the world.

But it was much more than a mere coffee ceremony that evening. The young women from athiopia explained that before the mocha is served, it is time to eat, and they did not miss the opportunity to prepare delicious local specialties for their guests beforehand. Lentils and meat, rice and salad were served – for some tender european palates the spicy sauces were quite a challenge – the food without cutlery anyway.

Alem kebede welde was the master of ceremonies. The 44-year-old first roasted the still green beans on the open fireplace. After rusting, these were finely crushed in the morser before the tedious procedure of making coffee began. An athiopian coffee ceremony is not a quick fix for the stressed everyday person. The coffee ceremony fulfills an important social function, explains barbel furst. This is where people come together – and that was also the case in munnerstadt. People chatted, sat together in a cozy atmosphere, looked at the glowing charcoal or at the handles of alem, who celebrated the coffee with great seriousness. "She is like a mother to us, says tigist bekele cobene about her roommate. Tigist, sarem G/meskel and helen dessu H/mariam served coffee in small cups and distributed cakes or popcorn – popcorn is a popular snack with coffee in athiopia. The athiopian manner thanked the participants in their own personal way for a successful evening. They sang and danced and everyone clapped along.

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